Scrumdiddlyumptious

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With words such as “scrumdiddlyumptious”, “ uckyslush, “ trogglehumping bogthumping grobswitcher’, who else could the author be, other than Roald Dahl, and the book The BFG.

Although he was born in 1916, Roald Dahl’s books are still as popular today as when they were first published, and can be enjoyed at any age.

As most generations invent new words, or reuse old words in a new context to describe their daily life, Dahl’s wonderfully creative words are timeless, so that even when taken out of context the image is immediately recognisable.

How often in our times could the television be more aptly described as a “telly-telly bunkum box” rather than just the TV? And wouldn’t we all like to be as creative as the BFG with our insults? Can you imagine the look of blank confusion on the face of your adversary if you called them a “squinky little squiddler”, a “piddling little pitsqueak” , a “squifflerotter”, or even a “cream puffnut”? So worth the effort.

His imagination does not only create colourful language, it also creates parallel worlds, as in James and the giant peach, where a spider, centipede, glow worm, grasshopper and earthworm are much more civilised than the human race, or, as the BFG would say “human beans”. Where Cloud Men control the weather, all rain, hail and rainbows, and where seagulls unknowingly comply with carrying a giant peach to New York, tied to the peach with spider silk.

His books tickle our hearts and tantalise our minds, encouraging us to see our world in new ways. In today’s society, this is often just what we need.

Don’t get so flussed…to me that is such a snitchy little jump. There’s not thingalingaling to it.

Are you a Roald Dahl fan? Check out the official Roal Dahl site.

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One Response to “Scrumdiddlyumptious”

  1. jam (library staff) Says:

    My favourite book is Charlie and the Chocolate factory! Wouldn’t it be great to live in a place as unusual. I have to admit though, I’ve always been a little afraid of the vermicious knids from the book’s sequal – Charlie and the Great Glass Elevator!

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